Education Is The Most Valuable Asset That You Can Have

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Could ‘self-reflection’ transform teaching?

When talking about education people often confuse it with schooling. Many think of places like schools or colleges when seeing or hearing the word. They might also look to particular jobs like teacher or tutor. The problem with this is that while looking to help people learn, the way a lot of schools and teachers operate is not necessarily something we can properly call education. They have chosen or fallen or been pushed into ‘schooling’ – trying to drill learning into people according to some plan often drawn up by others. Paulo Freire (1973) famously called this banking – making deposits of knowledge. Such ‘schooling’ too easily descends into treating learners like objects, things to be acted upon rather than people to be related to.

Education, as we understand it here, is a process of inviting truth and possibility, of encouraging and giving time to discovery. As John Dewey (1916) put it, it is a social process – ‘a process of living and not a preparation for future living. In this view,, educators look to learning and being with others rather than acting upon them. Their task is to reduce (related to the Greek notion of educere), to bring out or develop potential both in themselves and others.

When talking about education people often confuse it with schooling. Many think of places like schools or colleges when seeing or hearing the word. They might also look to particular jobs like teacher or tutor. The problem with this is that while looking to help people learn, the way a lot of schools and teachers operate is not necessarily something we can properly call education.

Deliberate and hopeful. It is learning we set out to make happen in the belief that we all can be more informed, respectful and wise. A process of inviting truth and possibility.

Grounded in a desire that at all may flourish and share in life. It is a cooperative and inclusive activity that looks to help us to live our lives as well as we can.

In what follows we will try to answer the question ‘what is education?’ by exploring these dimensions and the processes involved.

There are many benefits cited from teacher self reflection. These include:

• Better teaching and learning
• Greater innovation in the classroom
• Great engagement with students, and more lively and interesting lessons
• More confident teachers
• Professional growth as teachers find areas to explore in their teaching

When talking about education people often confuse it with schooling. Many think of places like schools or colleges when seeing or hearing the word. They might also look to particular jobs like teacher or tutor. The problem with this is that while looking to help people learn, the way a lot of schools and teachers operate is not necessarily something we can properly call education.

They have chosen or fallen or been pushed into ‘schooling’ – trying to drill learning into people according to some plan often drawn up by others. Paulo Freire (1973) famously called this banking – making deposits of knowledge. Such ‘schooling’ too easily descends into treating learners like objects, things to be acted upon rather than people to be related to.

“Education, as we understand it here, is a process of inviting truth and possibility, of encouraging and giving time to discovery. As John Dewey (1916) put it, it is a social process – ‘a process of living and not a preparation for future living. In this view,, educators look to learning and being with others rather than acting upon them. Their task is to reduce (related to the Greek notion of educere), to bring out or develop potential both in themselves and others. Such education is:”

Deliberate and hopeful. It is learning we set out to make happen in the belief that we all can ‘be more;
Informed, respectful and wise. A process of inviting truth and possibility.

Grounded in a desire that at all may flourish and share in life. It is a cooperative and inclusive activity that looks to help us to live our lives as well as we can. In what follows we will try to answer the question ‘what is education?’ by exploring these dimensions and the processes involved.

When talking about education people often confuse it with schooling. Many think of places like schools or colleges when seeing or hearing the word. They might also look to particular jobs like teacher or tutor. The problem with this is that while looking to help people learn, the way a lot of schools and teachers operate is not necessarily something we can properly call education.

They have chosen or fallen or been pushed into ‘schooling’ – trying to drill learning into people according to some plan often drawn up by others. Paulo Freire (1973) famously called this banking – making deposits of knowledge. Such ‘schooling’ too easily descends into treating learners like objects, things to be acted upon rather than people to be related to.

Education, as we understand it here, is a process of inviting truth and possibility, of encouraging and giving time to discovery. As John Dewey (1916) put it, it is a social process – ‘a process of living and not a preparation for future living. In this view,, educators look to learning and being with others rather than acting upon them. Their task is to reduce (related to the Greek notion of educere), to bring out or develop potential both in themselves and others. Such education is:

Deliberate and hopeful. It is learning we set out to make happen in the belief that we all can ‘be more;
Informed, respectful and wise. A process of inviting truth and possibility.

Grounded in a desire that at all may flourish and share in life. It is a cooperative and inclusive activity that looks to help us to live our lives as well as we can.

In what follows we will try to answer the question ‘what is education?’ by exploring these dimensions and the processes involved.

school of the future

GUIDE BOOK

The School of the Future Guide is aimed at helping school leaders and teachers make informed choices when designing the learning environments of the future using existing and upcoming technologies, as they seek to prepare children for the rest of the 21st century – the result is a more efficient and competitive school.

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